21 New free Python Template Projects for Years 7-9

21 new Python Project Templates have just been added to Blippit’s PureCode Python for secondary schools.

The templates have been created by an Industry Project Team of final year computer science students at Griffith University on the Gold Coast in Australia who have been working with Blippit Australia to bring their subject expertise to schools learning to code in the cloud with Blippit.

 

Bubble Algorithm
This sorts a list using a bubble sort algorithm, can you figure out how it works?
PureCode Python Project Templates

These new project templates are progressive with the concepts they present and of course being templates they are completely editable by the teacher if schools wants to make their own version of the project.

If you’re not using Blippit already you can register for a free account in the UK here and in AU here

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Fully Revised Yr 6 Unit for Summer 2016

Written to go hand in glove with Blippit’s App Maker over a half-term including video links and more for use in class.

Also included is a bonus mini-unit that we suggest you use as a ‘warm up’ lesson to heighten awareness of and increase ‘code curiosity’ in the children.

It’s all step-by-step with ready-to-go plans and videos built in so depending on your confidence level you can use it as is or do a bit of computing jazz and give it your own flavour.

Just click below to download the free PDF

Year 6 Plans

 

Byte at the Museum

Yesterday I took Blippit to the National Museum of Computing – immediate neighbour of Bletchley Park.  To be invited as part of their Bytes Festival and work directly with their visiting families surrounded by such history was not half-bad.

Out of school you get such an insight into how parents relate to their children and learning as a whole.  They share insights with you quite openly and comment on your limitless patience with their child who frankly drives them nuts most of the time.

There’s noone marking, setting targets or observing when it’s just you and a family which makes for some very natural and easy steps forwards.  One young man (Year 3) made an app and learned what HTML 5 markup language was as he worked with me on the side and his mum making encouraging comments as he progressed. To say he was ‘off his seat’ with excitement when he saw his app on mum’s phone (she downloaded a QR code reader to get it) is an understatement.

Another young man’s Dad regaled me with stories of his son’s disengagement at school contrasting with his persistence, resilience and immersion in his favoured world of technology.  It’s not an unusual story and we all know children like this but seeing how he learned was interesting.  Essentially it was broadly like this

  • “listen to the expert”
  • “grab the basics”
  • “build and try out”
  • “go over bits as needed with expert again”
  • “build towards a result”
  • “publish”
  • “improve on published app”
  • “re-publish”

I’ve been lucky (no doubt about that) to teach in many different schools and environments over the years sometimes as a ‘regular’ teacher, sometimes as an ‘advisory’ teacher and more recently as the ‘Blippit Man’.

blippitio manThe ‘Blippit Man’ tag does generate extra attention and effort from children no doubt at all so my reflections are mindful of how children respond to people they view as ‘experts’ from the ‘real’ world.

This bit of shine from an external expert isn’t sustainable and so it makes what teachers and children achieve together, day in day out, all the more remarkable.

The National Museum of Computing is an awe inspiring place for anyone with the slightest interest in technology and they’re pretty rammed with school visits and tours but if you’ve not been yet, do yourself a favour and go!

Colossus
Colossus

The Apprentice Meets Blippit

apprentice

On Monday 3rd March Blippit was a central tool supporting Task 4 for Apprentice hopefuls from years 5 & 6 at Abbey Community Primary School in Leicester.

(YouTube version is here if the one below is too slow)

[wpvideo xVthQzP8]

In half a day the teams were well underway with creating apps to support families with learning at home. Huge ideas as you’d expect.

Interestingly, the teams were very adept I thought at moving across platforms in creating their apps.  For example:

  1. They used the Makewav.es app to record video, sound and other things
  2. Then then brought the content straight in to Blippit via our Blippit Makewav.es Widget
  3. Next was a little impromptu HTML coding via the fabulous www.w3schools.com – no sweat.

Currently the apps they made, still evolving, are on the school’s website and the teams are seeking the votes of their peers – the equivalent of Nick & Anne!  Good luck to whoever makes it through to the next round!

note:
there’s a missing question mark in the video – it’ll get fixed.

Want to stretch Blippit with some code?

blippit snippitRight now a lot of people outside of the typical ICT circles are using Blippit to enable children to make apps in other parts of the curriculum like MfL, English and geography.

Some people want to be able to code as well though so here’s a very quick screenshot of how to access this area of Blippit.

*Mobile users can tap here to go to the Blippit Ideas app to hear the recording via the Adding Sound button.

addsoundtoapp